Monday, January 31, 2005

Modern Drunkard Magazine

Modern Drunkard Magazine. Here is an interesting periodical that I encourage you not to subscribe or get for your library. It features articles on famous drunks, drunkards of the month, the joys of alcohol, the role of alcohol in history, etc. The articles advocate for drunkness as well. Although this is a unique perspective, your school, public, or college library can do without this. One a postive note, all of the back issues are available for free online. And the articles are well written too.

The editor of this publication is Frank Kelly Rich. He was recently featured in News of the Weird. In an interview, he claimed that drunks were "an oppressed minority."

Now that is creative. The drunks are starting to use the language of victimhood! It may take time, but if enough of them start speaking like this and demanding to be seen as victims, they probably will eventually sway the folks in higher education. Several decades from now, disciplining someone for coming to work drunk could result in a campus protest, accusations of drunkphobia, demands for an apology, and the supervisor being sent off to a re-education workshop to learn to be more sensetive about alternative lifestyle choices. I hope I am retired by then...

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

MDM is a publication of humor and light hearted information- the writers of this publication are well spoken and provide their audience with an unmasked look at drunks... you my friend are taking an unrealistic look at what this publication could cause our society....if MDM actually could make a difference as large as changing rules and regulations concerning alcohol, I would give MDM a large pat on the back.... until then open, read and enjoy!!

Anonymous said...

"We have enough problems with drunkeness, why encourage it?"

The Modern Drunkards do not encourage drunkenness in the sense that staggeringly immature, sophomoric fraternity boys have come to know it. They teach us how to drink as Ladies and Gentlemen. Perhaps if more college students were to read the magazine, they would learn there's a world of boozing outside of toga parties, vomitting in bushes, and picking fights on campus.

Drunkard said...

"We have enough problems with drunkeness, why encourage it?"

The Modern Drunkards do not encourage drunkenness in the sense that staggeringly immature, sophomoric fraternity boys have come to know it. They teach us to drink as Ladies and Gentlemen. Perhaps if younger audiences were to get a hold of the magazine, they would learn that there is a world of boozing outside of toga parties, vomitting in the punch bowl, and picking fights on campus.

Grey Goose said...

Hmmmmm. So you applaud the writing, yet have a problem with the content the perhaps you're reading too much into this. If you have really have read everything that's posted on the site, I think you would see that you are taking this way too seriously.

As stated by the previous 3 posts, MDM is about cocktails, carousing, and class. It is also about people who proudly bear the standard of those who indulge in drinking and enjoying themselves unapologetically. Lumping the MDM crowd in with frat boys puking off of too much Coors Light and abusive hooch-hound husbands in trailers is more off-the-mark than the Missile Defense Shield. We are a fun-loving bunch that, yes, hold down jobs, have families, and enjoy each other's company.

Regards,
Grey Goose
MDM Moderator

drunkard too said...

I don't agree with your point of view. I don't think this magazine is about claiming drunkards are victims at all. It is more about bringing dignity back into the age old practice of drinking and the enjoyment that comes from drinking. However in this warped society, drinking is oftentimes frowned upon and used as an excuse for other bad acts (how many politicians have we seen go into Alcohol Recovery programs after they are caught making sexual advances to teenagers or caught accepting bribes, etc.). This magazine is actually there to educate the masses on the benefits of drinking, of which there are many, and to fight against the wrongful demonization of Alcohol in our society. I think students in colleges and adults frequenting public libraries could learn a lot from this magazine, to counter the mainstream 'alcohol is bad' message that is often repeated or implied.