Sunday, January 30, 2005

Promoting Information Literacy Skills to Distance Learners: The Athabasca University Library’s Digital Reference Centre

Promoting Information Literacy Skills to Distance Learners: The Athabasca University Library’s Digital Reference Centre. This paper is by Kay Johnson and Tony Tin. It was presented at the ICDE/CADE Calgary Conference in 2002.

From the site:

With the arrival of the information superhighway, and with research and learning occurring increasingly at a distance, libraries are positioning themselves to provide service in an electronic environment in which remote users access digital resources. D. Kaye Gapen’s (1993) definition of the virtual library combines the concept of a physical library collection with the concept of the library as “an electronic network which provides access to, and delivery from, external worldwide library and commercial information and knowledge sources” (p. 1). Library users access not only one library, but many; not only library sources, but information of all types. Their reach extends far beyond the traditional library’s limited collection of selected information sources.

Academic librarians can now routinely expect students to bring resources to their attention and to ask for assistance with these resources. With remote access, librarians are faced with new challenges in the delivery of bibliographic instruction and reference services to students who are often “invisible”, silent and, now more than ever, in need of information literacy skills.

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