Wednesday, November 30, 2005

WHAT ALL LIBRARIANS CAN LEARN FROM TEACHER LIBRARIANS: INFORMATION LITERACY A KEY CONNECTOR FOR LIBRARIES

WHAT ALL LIBRARIANS CAN LEARN FROM TEACHER LIBRARIANS: INFORMATION LITERACY A KEY CONNECTOR FOR LIBRARIES. This is a speech from 2001. I just found it the other day when surfing. It gives a good overview of what academic librarians can learn about information literacy from school librarians. The speaker is Ken Haycock from the University of British Columbia.

From the site:

My task in this paper is to synthesize the research in information literacy in the K-12 sector, particularly as it relates to successful implementation of programs, to integrate this research with recent studies in information literacy in academic libraries, and to propose means for moving the post secondary information literacy agenda forward. Of course, some of the research is contextual and tentative such that these might best be considered propositions for further study. Having said this, however, these assertions are not simply personal opinion or preference, or reflections of a personal belief system, as is too often the basis for our decision making.

There is sufficient evidence from the research in teacher librarianship to suggest that under certain conditions, a qualified teacher librarian does have a positive effect on student achievement. My intention is to review this research base and to propose implications for academic librarians in postsecondary or tertiary institutions.

The sources for this analysis are primarily research studies and syntheses of research completed by Haycock, (1, 3) Krashen, (4) Lance and others (5) and Loertscher and Woolls(6).

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